Comment

Our Thanksgiving Think Wrong Heroes


At this time of giving thanks, we are grateful for the Wrong Thinkers at Patagonia.


While retailers across the land have been gearing up for months for the windfall of a contrived shopping frenzy called Black Friday, Patagonia has been busy thinking wrong about how they might use all that pent up shopping gusto for good. 

We've long admired their counter-consumerism culture. In recent years their "Don't Buy This Jacket" ad has brought a smile to our mouths and tears of appreciation to our eyes. 

Dont-Buy-This-Jacket-1250.jpg

How can they be so damned smart, do damned right, and so damned good? 
Patagonia, you are officially our Thanksgiving Think Wrong Heroes!

Keep kicking the status quo where it counts!


Worn Wear: a Film About the Stories We Wear Presented by Patagonia Directed by Keith, Lauren, Chris, and Dan Malloy.

Worn Wear is an exploration of quality—in the things we own and the lives we live.

Check out this CNN Money Holiday Shopping article to learn more about Patagonia's bold move on behalf of our planet.

"The threats facing our planet affect people of every political stripe, of every demographic, in every part of the country," Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario, wrote in a company blogpost detailing the Black Friday effort. "We all stand to benefit from a healthy environment." 


Comment

Comment

Build a Rocket

Be Bold: Moonshot Drill


Use when you need to escape the biases, orthodoxies, and assumptions that define the status quo—and that limit the impact you might have.


Think Right
Operate within the status quo pursuing incremental improvement and risk mitigation tactics such as market research and adoption of best practices.

Think Wrong
Boldly seek challenges and opportunities that exist beyond the limitations of the status quo. Imagine impact others would never dare to.


Outcomes

  • Elevated impact
  • Shared vision of impact
  • Aspirational goals
  • Reasons to believe

Instructions


Step 1
Introduce the Moonshot Drill.

Step 2
Have Blitzers generate ideas for the most astounding thing we might do to address the Blitz Challenge.

Step 3
Give three dots to each Blitzer. Have Blitzers dot vote on the three moonshots that they find most compelling.

Step 4
Have Blitzers move their top vote-getting moonshot to the “Why people will think that is crazy?” portion of the Moonshot Poster.

Step 5
Have Blitzers identify why people with think that they are crazy for pursing the promoted moonshot.

Step 6
Give Blitzers three more dots. Have Blitzers dot vote on the three most compelling reasons people will think their moonshot is crazy.

Step 7
Have Blitzers move their top vote-getting reason people will think their moonshot is crazy to the “What we know that they don’t” portion of the Moonshot Poster.

Step 8
Have Blitzers identify what we know that no one else knows—why we believe the moonshot is possible.

Tip: It can be challenging for teams to push away from the status quo to set goals and imagine moonshots. Visit each team as they’re generating moonshot ideas and encourage them to be as aspirational as possible—“Imagine achieving something that your grand children’s peers might be amazed to learn you were a part of.”

 

When to use the Drill

Introduce the Drill

Run the Drill


The Origins of Moonshot

Astro Teller is the inspiration for the Be Bold: Moonshot Drill. Watch his recent TED talk about the role of moonshots at X (formerly Google X).


Want to use more Think Wrong Drills to generate status-quo busting solutions?


Buy Think Wrong, the book here.

Get the Moonshot Poster and other FREE online resources to help you run the 18 drills featured in Think Wrong here.

Sign up for our next Think Wrong Master Class here. Enter promo code: FREE BRAINS for an additional 10% discount.


Comment

Comment

Set brazen goals.

Be Bold: Deflection Point Drill


Use when you want to explore the difference you might make—and the change that might require.


Think Right
Optimize the status quo.

Think Wrong
Create a bold path that deflects from the status quo to change things from how they are to how they might be.


Outcomes

  • The way things are and how they might be are framed
  • Identification of useful trends and global forces that might be leveraged
  • People and partners are emotionally and functionally engaged

Instructions


Step 1
Introduce the Deflection Point Drill.

Step 2
Have Wrong Thinkers make a horizontal line on the wall with blue painters tape. Have them write: “Today’s Path” on the line with a Sharpie.

Step 3
Using Post-its, ask Wrong Thinkers to describe “Today’s Path” (e.g., vulnerable food supply, disconnect between food and seed, general apathy, etc.).

Step 4
Using the blue tape, have Wrong Thinkers create a new line coming off the status quo at a 45° angle, and label it “The Bold Path.”

Step 5
Using Post-its, ask Wrong Thinkers to describe “The Bold Path” (e.g., sustainable food supply, a clear connection between food and seed, real interest among the public, etc.).

Tips You might spend time considering big trends you can take advantage of to help shift from Today’s Path to your Bold Path. 

You might also take stock of current assumptions, orthodoxies, and biases that keep you on Today’s paths, and new habits, ways of working, or capabilities that might help you create and stay on your Bold Path.

 

When to use the Drill

Introducing Drill

Running the Drill


Want run more Think Wrong Drills?


Buy the book here.

Sign up for FREE online resources to help run the 18 drills featured in Think Wrong here.

Sign up for our next Think Wrong Master Class here. Enter promo code: FREE BRAINS for an additional 10% discount.


Comment

Comment

Welcome to Campando Maryknoll

 Original art: Tucker Nichols Hack: Tena Watts (Think Wrong Master Class grad)

Original art: Tucker Nichols
Hack: Tena Watts (Think Wrong Master Class grad)


A report from Eugene Shirley, a recently certified Wrong Thinker from last week’s Think Wrong Master Class.


I had a great meeting today with our favorite nuns and we’re confirmed for Campando, Jan. 20, 21 and 22 at the Maryknoll Sisters compound in Monrovia, at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains. (bears included). They will provide food and lodging, targeting LA County millennial leaders from social justice and environmental communities who feel in need of rejuvenation (a small group at first, to experiment). We will Make Stuff and Bet Small—prototyping a program they hope to replicate multiple times throughout the year.

I took the Make Stuff: Name It Poster (see photo with three of the sisters pictured), used it to catch them up on our ideas from last week, and then they took it from there. I took along two extra blank posters and they wanted me to leave them so they could think wrong on their own.  

 Eugene lead the sisters in the Make Stuff: Name It Drill

Eugene lead the sisters in the Make Stuff: Name It Drill

They loved the name of Campando, only suggesting we call this specific event “Campando Maryknoll” in order to make it their own. One sister in particular loved “Pandonista.” She had just returned from El Paso helping to settle a recent influx of emigres from Mexico who have aimed to get back across the border and with their families before the presidency changes (these nuns are fierce). “Just live it” seemed to them exactly right as a tagline. Of course, everyone LOVED the hack of Tucker Nichol's wonderful image of the Pando trees.  

The sisters started working on the program. They were very focused on reflection and rejuvenation. They thought the idea of this being an oasis of reflection—an idea inspired by the Get Out: That's Odd Drill (Virgin Tub) seemed exactly right. The sisters suggested we start on Friday night with a wine and beer Happy Hour, and end the weekend with a hike in the mountains and brunch at a waterfall with a ritual focused on giving Pandonistas strength for their social justice and environmental missions. The sisters have served in the most dangerous places all over the world and will share their stories on Saturday. We’ll use the Think Wrong Lab to design the program.

They brilliantly suggested this be declared a cellphone-free zone (I remember seeing photos of Tucker’s images around FB on that) and that Pandonistas place their cellphones in a box on a common table during orientation on Friday night. They can give their significant others the convent’s switchboard number in case of emergency. I absolutely fell in love with this idea. 


Eugene B. Shirley, Jr. is founding president and CEO of Pando Populus and a long-time entrepreneur. For twenty-five years, he produced prime-time programming for PBS and some 30 countries under Pacem Productions. He was founding CEO of a text analytics firm.  He is a former Jennings Randolph Fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace.


Sign up for the next Think Wrong Master Class here.

Learn, apply, and master Solve Next’s radical problem-solving system to reliably produce surprising, ingenious, and sometimes magical solutions to your most wicked questions and opportunities.


Comment

Comment

Hey Chief Innovation Officer. You’re Fired.


(And Two Simple Ways to Stop That From Happening)


Trying to innovate within your organization is one of the most courageous or foolhardy jobs you can choose to take on, because between you and the needed change are a hundred named and self-appointed Chief Don’t F*&k It Up Officers who’ve made it their mission in life to keep everything running just the way it is.

Get it wrong—you’re fired.

You're charged with delivering Goldilocks Innovation—change that isn't so big that it causes disruption and distraction to the revenue producing machine, but not so small that nobody notices. You need to find the enigmatic innovation sweet spot that's just right.

Get it wrong—you’re fired.

You're expected to demonstrate measurable ROI for the unknown, in an environment where certainty is valued more than great questions. And where not knowing is seen as weakness rather than an exciting opportunity to discover.

Get it wrong—you’re fired.

You gather motivated outlaws who want you to lead them on the bold path of change to the land of “how things could be.” But metrics, policy, personnel, business-as-usual, best practice, embedded culture, and CDFIUO roadblocks stymie you at every turn. Over time your merry band of intrapreneurs gets worn down and depressed. Now all of your effort is spent lifting the moral of some of your organization’s top talent—for fear of otherwise losing them.

Get it wrong—you’re fired.

“Think Wrong holds a mirror up to leaders and demands that they do the hard work with their internal entrepreneurs to overcome the orthodoxies, antibodies, and inertia that kill new ideas or, at best, starve them of oxygen.”
Linda Yates, CEO and Founder at mach49, Henry Crown Fellow with the Aspen Institute

Make sure you and your team don’t get fired.

Use the following Think Wrong Frameworks to identify a bold path from which you can deliver high impact change—and to create meaningful context to defend your efforts from forces that might otherwise destroy them.

The Deflection Point Framework

The well-trodden path of the status quo is known, understood, and predictable. But if we stay on this predictable path nothing changes. So nothing changes. The impact you seek requires that you depart from this predictable path and chart a bold new path—one that delivers a shift from “How Things Are” to “How Things Might Be.”

Start by drawing this simple diagram.

Think_Wrong_Predictable_Path.png

1. Draw a horizontal line. This line represents your Predictable Path. Below it, identify the current projects, policies, practices and structures that represent how and what your organization does today— and will continue to do if nothing changes.


2. Draw a line at 45° from the Predictable Path. This line represents your Bold Path. Above it, identify the initiatives that your organization is engaged in that represent a departure from the status quo. The further up this line and to the right, the greater the departure from the way things are. Also add what you might want to change from “Current State” if you could—be bold about your aspirational “To Be” State.

3. Plot what and who might complicate or resist your departure from the status quo in the space between the lines—conspiring to pull you back onto the Predictable Path.

Engage your colleagues in envisioning the changes that need to be made, what might get in your way, and what still needs to be done and done better—by inviting them to draw this picture with you.

The Uncertain/Unknown Framework

All projects are not the same—that goes without saying. So, not all projects should operate under the same set of practices and rules.

Start by drawing the 3x3 grid above. Then map the projects you plotted on the Deflection Point Framework onto the 3x3. Be honest about where they live. Depending on your organization the distribution will vary.
 


For well-established organizations many projects will be in the top right where both the challenge and solution are certain and known. These projects are often focused on improvements in efficiency, optimization, or technology. The Think Right Practices of ROI, metrics, analytics, and best practices make a real difference here.

For less well-established organizations—and organizations that are trying to shake things up—many projects will focus on disruption and change. Those are likely to fall in the uncertain and unknown territory.

You’ve now identified the projects where Think Right Practices are the go-to tool set, and those where you should Think Wrong. Use the Uncertain/Unknown Framework to set new ground rules—and expectations—about which practices will be applied to which projects.

Overtime, your portfolio of change (read: innovation) projects will move up and to the right as you become more certain of the real problem you are solving, the needs you are meeting, and which solutions truly work best.


To check out some fantastic tools for managing your innovation portfolio reach out to the fine folks at www.valize.co. And follow Valize founder and Think Wrong co-conspirator Rita Gunther McGrath on twitter @rgmcgrath.


To learn more about thinking wrong order a copy of Think Wrong: How to Conquer the Status Quo and Do Work That Matters and check out our website.


Comment

Comment

Innovators Start Your Engines


(Or, Design Thinking’s Fatal Flaw)


If I asked you to choose between two machines that could determine how your organization might compete, create value, grow market share, increase revenues, and deliver impact in the future how would you know which one to pick?

Chief Innovation Officers have been kicking the tires on design thinking’s engine for more than a few years now. But Think Wrong is not just this year’s model.

What’s the difference?

Design thinking and thinking wrong are both problem solving systems. Like a machine, each requires certain inputs, performs specific functions, and generates outputs that produce value.

Design thinking is defined by IDEO (the driving force behind popularizing design thinking) as: “A human-centered approach to innovation that draws from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success.”

At Solve Next, we define thinking wrong as: “The ability to conquer biology and culture to change things from how they are to how they might be.”

Picture design thinking as a machine that puts the the person for whom you are solving at its center.

Picture thinking wrong as a machine that puts the impact your organization wants to have and the people to whom that impact matters at its center.

Design thinking produces simpler, more intuitive solutions than what existed before—solutions that reflect the users’ environments, ways of operating, and their cultures.

Thinking wrong produces unexpected, disruptive solutions that break the biases, orthodoxies, and assumptions that form that status quo and have the ability to drive the positive change their champions aspire to create in the world.

IDEO and design thinking found their way into the popular vernacular in 1999, when ABC’s Nightline ran a story on them. That segment included IDEO’s redesign of the shopping cart. It featured their user-centered observations in supermarkets and what they revealed about shoppers’ behaviors. It showcased IDEO’s futuristic cart with a detachable basket—IDEO had noted that shoppers repeatedly parked their carts and walked down aisles for specific items. They designed a cart that had the potential to improve things for shoppers. Disappointingly, 17 years later, shopping carts remain largely unchanged and unimproved.

Think Wrong problem solving machine would not have started with observations of shoppers. Instead, it would begin by exploring what the client (grocers in this case) most aspired to accomplish. Thinking wrong would challenge the grocers to be bold and to imagine the greatest impact they might have. It would ask: “What value are they seeking to produce for the communities they serve, their stakeholders, society at large, the environment, and future generations?” It would invite shoppers into the process, to ensure their wants, needs, and ideas were central solutions that might create that positive change. It would enable grocer and shopper to imagine, prototype, and implement new ways of shopping that might lead to that impact together.

Like design thinking clients, think wrong clients need help putting their customers, beneficiaries, constituents, members, partners, and people at the center of their design efforts. But they also want to have impact that is not just marginally better than others. They want to change the game. They want what John and I have for years had called “Big D” design. Not the decorative stuff that gets applied after the strategic thinking has been done, but the kind that has the power to change the course of markets, nations, society, and future generations.

So, choose design thinking when you want to make a significant improvement to the way things are. But if you’re aim is to change the way things are to how you think they should be, choose thinking wrong.


“REBBL has $1 billion opportunity ahead of it. That’s quite a market for a company that currently has annual sales of less than $10 million, and just six employees.” Mark Rampolla, co-founder of PowerPlant Ventures, in a recent Fortune Magazine article.

REBBL is a wonderful example of what the Think Wrong engine can produce. It was born at Not For Sale’s Montara Circle, where Solve Next helped more than 50 leaders from across the private and public sectors take on the challenge of ending the exploitation of villagers and their environment in the Peruvian Amazon. The result, a refreshing tonic made, in part, from ingredients purchased from those villagers, economically inoculating them from exploitation. “We love launching products that have the power to change culture, start conversations, and challenge the status quo” says Palo Hawken, co-founder of REBBL in this recent BEVNET release.


Comment

Comment

Culture of Innovation Fail

GasLanterns.png

(Or, Why People Build New Homes with Fake Gas Lanterns by the Front Door)


If, as the leader of a multi-billion dollar corporation, the director of modest non-profit, the president of a university—or whatever your position—you are responsible for building a culture of innovation you’re probably frustrated with the results.

My home state gives you a pretty good hint why.

Maine is a place nostalgic in nature, evoking lighthouses, Andrew Wyeth paintings, sailboats, colonial architecture, and lobster dinners on the beach at sunset. It all fits comfortably and appealingly into our collective consciousness.

“Maine, the way life should be” is our official state slogan.

Most homes in Maine (with the exception of double-wide trailers, worthy of a later blog post) are old or built to look old. I live in a large, old house built in 1863. So, “What’s wrong with that?” you might ask. Nothing. Except that it costs a fortune to heat with oil, the rooms are relatively small, and maintenance is high. In 1863, they were building houses using 1863 technology and aesthetics. Building has come a long way in 153 years.

Or has it?

I was recently in Carrabassett Valley, Maine, home to the Sugarloaf ski area, and noticed a relatively new “ski” house. It wasn’t built in the traditional ski house vernacular. Instead, it was built to resemble a colonial home from the 1800’s. Complete with fake gas lanterns, non-moveable shutters, and ornamental columns by the front door.

So, what’s going on here—and in innovation resistant organizations? Why do people keep putting fake gas lanterns on your front doors?

Well, it’s biological and cultural. A specific idea of “home” gets hard-wired into our brains at an early age. Images of cozy cottages with white picket fences universally represent comfort, safety and stability. Over time, we connect those images to those feelings through synaptic connections that forge enduring neural pathways. A superhighway is built connecting what we experience and feel to what we believe. The result? We build 2016 houses on a 1863 blueprint. Anything that varies from the norm is actively discouraged or outright rejected.

What’s true for our homes is true for our organizations. We think that we’re making rational, well-reasoned decisions when we are following pre-determined pathways in our brains. We're building on old plans. We do this even when making big decisions with big financial ramifications, such as building a new office or plant, inventing and funding a new business, or adopting potentially life altering policies (think how hard it is for us to move at scale from our oil dependency to renewable energy—even when confronted with overwhelming evidence of the impact climate change on our planet).

The gravity of the status quo seems inescapable. Culture change is tough. It means overcoming the way our brains and cultures conspire against innovations that threaten the way things are.

But breaking the grips of our orthodoxies is not impossible. When our friends and collaborators Linda Yates and Paul Holland decided to build a new home in Portola Valley, they didn’t hesitate to let go of conventions about what a house is or is not. They were boldly set out to build the greenest home in America.

“We've always been passionate about environmental causes,” says Holland. “We wanted to take our family out of the oil-based economy, so there are no oil-based products associated with the house: there is no natural gas, no plastic, no PVC. Everything is powered by renewable energy sources, either solar or ground-source heat exchange.”

  Take a peek at this    recent Style magazine article    featuring the Yates-Holland home. No fake gas lanterns there.

Take a peek at this recent Style magazine article featuring the Yates-Holland home. No fake gas lanterns there.

If you really want to lead a culture of innovation, give your people the permission, language, frameworks, tools, and training they’ll need to conquer the current orthodoxies, beliefs, and assumptions responsible for the status quo—and to do work that matters.


 www.tahmahlah.com

www.tahmahlah.com

In the spirit of Think Wrong’s Move Fast Practice, Yates and Holland are not proprietary about their home. They’ve created this website to share what they have learned and the resources required to build greener more sustainable homes.


Comment

Comment

Too Big to Solve


(Or, The World’s A Mess And We’re Taking It Personally)


Our partner John often gives a talk that begins with many of the big problems facing us as a species:

Hunger, poverty, war, obesity, AIDs, climate change.

It can be pretty daunting. His despair about these issues is real. So is the optimism he, Mike, and I share about mankind’s ability to create ingenious solutions to those challenges.

It might matter less to us if we were not fathers. I hope not. I like to think that we’re conscientious people who care about our fellow man. But, because we are dads, it’s personal.

Our children will inherit the crises made by our and prior right thinking generations. Solving those crises requires stepping outside the status quo—conquering biology and culture—and coming up with answers that might seem crazy or impossible today.

We started Future to put a dent in that particular universe of problems. We’ve sought to work with people who do work that matters. We built our business inspired by—and to help more—leaders like you.

People who are working hard to make the world a better place through their businesses, foundations, government agencies, nonprofits, and schools.

People who are not happy with the way things are.

People who have a vision for a better tomorrow—and the scars to prove how hard they have been battling to create that change.

As a consulting firm run by three partners we've always sought out clients and partners with whom we might be multipliers for good. When we all join forces we make a big difference. But what we can accomplish through our services alone is not enough.

That’s why we’ve written our forthcoming book, Think Wrong: How to Conquer The Status Quo and Do Work That Matters, and why we’ve built the Think Wrong Lab, our cloud-based software.

We want to foster resilient, resourceful leaders and organizations capable of making a difference and blazing bold new paths.

We want to unleash what one of our Think Wrong Heroes, Yvon Chouinard, CEO of Patagonia, might refer to as your inner-juvenile delinquent. He recently told Bloomberg, “...to understand an entrepreneur, you should study a juvenile delinquent. They're both saying: ‘This sucks and I'm going to do it another way.’ You have to want to break the rules and prove that your way works.”

We couldn't agree more. We want to equip that restless delinquent, our children, and their peers with the necessary resources to bring crazy, mind-bending, rule-breaking solutions to life.

If we do our job well, the next time someone proclaims a challenge, “Too big to solve” you’ll have the confidence to reject the way things are, to think wrong, and to leave the world a better place than you found it.


Watch a recent TEDx talk by John. Thinking wrong is the opposite of following accepted orthodoxy. Future has developed an undeniable problem solving system that works across many disciplines and levels of difficulty. It's the best of design thinking married with positive change and impact.


Comment

Think wrong, make stuff, do good.

1 Comment

Think wrong, make stuff, do good.

Meet Maria Sykes and Jack Forinash. They are Auburn University architecture graduates, the program made famous by Samuel Mockbee’s Rural Studio in rural Hale County, Alabama.

After graduating from college, the “right” path would be to move to a big city and get a job with the best architecture firm possible. Time to work off those student loans and design corporate office buildings. Ugh.

Instead, they decided to take the “wrong” path and move to the unlikely town of Green River, Utah, which has a population of 973 people and is located on the banks of the Green River. Definitely not Brooklyn. Once a thriving town and home to an Air Force missile testing base, the town has fallen on hard times like so much of rural America. Most of the buildings in the downtown are empty and boarded up. Some are about to collapse and one is now an accidental “guano farm” and home to hundreds of bats. Nevertheless, Jack and Maria fell in love with the scruffy little town and set up a non-profit called Epicenter in 2009 to help drive positive change.

Once established, Epicenter purchased a historic building, redesigned the space and renovated the structure. And here is where things start to get really interesting and “wrong” 

Not only did Jack and Maria deviate from the expected career path by moving to a dying town, they have executed their projects at a high level of design absent from organizations focused on rural community development. Instead of conforming to the orthodoxies of small-town non-profits, they busted the status quo and have built a fantastic headquarters for their work that helps to attract a growing community of like-minded creative insurgents.

This week we ran a 2-day Think Wrong Blitz with Epicenter to generate ideas for future projects at Epicenter. Stay tuned for updates on the proposed bunkhouse/hostel (see the Kex Hostel in Iceland) to make it easier for more people and groups to fall in love with the town of Green River.




1 Comment

If Picasso Had a 3D Printer

Comment

If Picasso Had a 3D Printer

If you can imagine it, you can create it. And there’s the problem.

3D printing is changing the world—it is disrupting manufacturing, logistics, models for intellectual property, and the credit markets needed for inventory. Calculations around economies of scale change radically—even if unit costs increase they are offset by process efficiency.

But that’s the economics, from a human perspective we now have opportunities to create molds, casts and objects for shapes and intricacies that were previously cost or technically prohibitive. Engineers are no longer constrained as they were in the past—we can construct shapes that surprise, delight, and work in ways never previously conceived. The CFO can no longer say legendary doesn’t fit the budget.

You can have a product quickly and cost effectively made just for you, when you want it. The quality assurance that came with making everything the same, at massive scale will be available on a production run of one.

We have reached a point where, in the words of William Arthur Ward “If you can imagine it, you can create it.”

And there’s the rub.

For many of us, our natural born ingenuity has atrophied. Our problem-solving synaptic pathways are welded firmly in place. So our ability to imagine has become the limiting factor of what we can do. Our fears and our brains hold us back.

The Think Wrong Practices break those connections allow us to picture whole new ways of solving our challenges. When we practice Be Bold to set our aspirations higher, Get Out to invite serendipity, and Let Go to conceive the inconceivable—we smash those calcified synaptic pathways that kept leading us to the same solutions.

During a Think Wrong Blitz, we invite Outsiders to help shake things up. People who bring own unique points-of-view, expertise, and insight—coupled with a useful naiveté about our clients’ challenges and domain. They often help make the orthogonal leaps required to escape the pull of our assumptions, orthodoxies, and biases.

The future will belong to those who can imagine well—and fast. And execute even faster. Again. And again. And again.

Where quality, process, and efficiency were once the most important factor of production, now imagination, quality, and speed are key to winning. 

Mass scale 3D printing is going to change the world as we know it. To learn just how you might harness its disruptive power we encourage you to Be Bold, Get Out, Let Go, Make Stuff, Bet Small, and Move Fast.

And that’s where we can help. 

P.S. Those crazy little creatures in the collage at the top are from Crayon Creations

Comment